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External Access > PubMed LinkOut
ISSN Number: 1203-4754
Title: Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume Number: 16
Issue Number: 04
Page Number: 261
Published: 6 time(s) per Year

Vitiligo and Associated Autoimmune Disease: Retrospective Review of 300 Patients

Background:Vitiligo, the most common cutaneous depigmentation disorder, has reported associations with other autoimmune diseases. However, literature on the strengths of the associations is conflicting, and no data on the subject exist from a Canadian population.Objective:To determine autoimmune disease associations with vitiligo and which, if any, screening bloodwork is appropriate in vitiligo patients.Methods:A retrospective review of vitiligo patients admitted to the Toronto Western Hospital phototherapy unit was conducted from January 1, 2000, to August 30, 2009. Data regarding patient characteristics, vitiligo clinical features (family history, age at onset, type, extent), associated diseases in the patient and family, and admission bloodwork (hemoglobin, vitamin B12, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], antinuclear antibody) were recorded and compared, using the Fisher exact test where applicable.Results:A total of 300 patient charts were reviewed (average age 41.5 ± 15.5 years; 47% male, 53% female). Hypothyroidism was present in 12.0% and pernicious anemia in 1.3% of patients—significant increases over the population prevalence. No other differences in prevalence were seen compared to the general population. TSH was increased in 3.7% of patients without a history of hypothyroidism. Hemoglobin and vitamin B12 were decreased in 0.3% of vitiligo patients without a history of pernicious anemia.Conclusion:We found a significantly higher prevalence of hypothyroidism and pernicious anemia in vitiligo patients.
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